A Photography Guide To Capturing Yosemite National Park

Yosemite National Park located in the Sierra Madre Mountains of California, is one of the most beautiful and inspiring places in the world, and only a few equal to it. That’s why thousands of tourists visit the national park regularly. Yosemite’s Half Dome or Yosemite Falls are its most popular draws.

merced-river-half-dome-iStock
Image source:amazonaws.com

Here are the best spots from which to photograph Yosemite National Park:

Valley View/Gates of the Valley

You’ll see this photograph everywhere when you search for Yosemite on the internet. It’s popular because of the stark contrast of the serenity of the river and the majesty of El Capitan, the tallest mountain face in the park. The place is perfect to photograph during sunrise and sunset.

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Image source:dailymail.co.uk

 

Horsetail Falls

This is a natural phenomenon that happens only in February involving the angle of the sun. Since it only happens for a couple of weeks in February, the influx of photographers will be higher than normal peak hours. But the result will be worth it after you capture a false as if it was lava.

Half Dome

This is probably the most famous image that represents Yosemite National Park. There are several spots from which to photograph Half Dome, but the easiest to access is probably the Sentinel Bridge.

Hi there! My name’s Keith W. Springer. I’m a retired photographer from New York, and now, I spend my free time taking photos of national parks around the country. Visit my blog to read more of my adventure.

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